Monthly Archives: March 2016

Researchers Learn How The Bat Got Its Wings

An international team of scientists, including groups from UC San Francisco, Gladstone Institutes, and the University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa, have for the first time identified genes and gene regulatory elements that are essential in wing development in the Natal long-fingered bat.

Fluorescent Nanoparticle Tracks Cancer Treatment’s Effectiveness in Hours

Bioengineers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed a new technique to help determine if chemotherapy is working in as few as eight hours after treatment.

Integral sets limits on gamma rays from merging black holes

Following the discovery of gravitational waves from the merging of two black holes, ESA’s Integral satellite has revealed no simultaneous gamma rays, just as models predict.

AIDF Asia Summit 2016 to focus on challenges of safe drinking water and sanitation

In light of the United Nations World Water Day, the Aid & International Development Forum (AIDF) Asia Summit 2016 emphasises the importance of freshwater and sanitation in transforming societies and economies while improving livelihoods.

NASA’s Spitzer Maps Climate Patterns on a Super-Earth

Observations from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope have led to the first temperature map of a super-Earth planet — a rocky planet nearly two times as big as ours.

Engineering Black Gold, as Light as the Bones of Birds

A new research affiliated with UNIST, Korea, suggests a new material that is more solid and 30% lighter than standard gold.

NASA Selects Instrument Team to Build Next-Gen Planet Hunter

NASA has selected a team to build a new, cutting-edge instrument that will detect planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets, by measuring the miniscule “wobbling” of stars.

How to make metal alloys that stand up to hydrogen

A team of MIT researchers has found a way of greatly reducing the damaging effects these metals suffer from exposure to hydrogen.

Herschel reveals a ribbon of future stars

The Milky Way is laced with clouds of dust and gas that could become the nursery of the next generation of stars.

The time for unmanned ships has arrived

Unmanned ships have received relatively little media attention compared to aerial drones and self-driving cars. Researchers in Korea have been developing technologies to enable and facilitate the realization of unmanned autonomous ships in the near future.

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